How to get your first booking/increase bookings

 

  • Allow short notice bookings, especially in the beginning — i.e parents can book up until, say, an hour before. Many new teachers’ first bookings come through last-minute bookings (since the most popular teachers might already be booked if someone is looking so last-minute). Just note that you should expect to keep an eye on your emails so that you do not miss a last minute sign-up.
  • After each class, send personalized feedback to the parent — you can have a template or create something new every time, but we recommend covering what you taught and how the child did, along with any personalized information or feedback you learned during class. Most importantly, encourage them to come back and leave a review (if you think they’ll leave a good one).
  • Be “binge-worthy”. Invite bookers to come back to another class of yours that’s similar, or another session of this class with a certain special activity. Or, to really encourage students to come back again and again, you can make the class available as a drop-in or a semester! If a family likes the drop-in, you can suggest that they sign up for the regularly scheduled semester class so they don’t have to book it week after week!
  • Open yourself up to as many parents and kids as you can by teaching different age ranges, times, subjects, etc., especially in the beginning. Once you’re more established you can refine your schedule as needed, but in the beginning you never know what is going to work! We recommend limiting age groups to less than 5 years. For example, a class listed as 4-6 would do better than a class listed as 4-17.
  • Schedule as many sessions of a class as you can, especially during peak hours! The more slots you have open, the more chances you have to get booked.
  • If you do get a booking, make the best first impression possible so the family wants to come back! Be on time, end on time, keep it organized, get to know the student, etc.
  • Make your activity description SEO-friendly by using lots of keywords, but also make it as detailed as possible — describe not only what kids will do in the class (at least 3 sentences for a drop-in class and 200 words for a semester), but feel free to get even more nitty gritty: how will kids interact with you? What materials will kids get to utilize and to what effect? What materials will you use to teach (sharing screen to a video, using your special puppet friend, etc.). What’s your teaching style? 
  • Ask parents and kids what classes they’d love to see—use your students as your focus group! Plus, if you offer something they suggest, they’ll be highly motivated to return.

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